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Emergency Information/Closings

 EMERGENCY CLOSING &

INFORMATION REMINDERS!

IMPORTANT INFORMATION!

HOW TO HELP YOUR CHILD!

For Safety and Security of our Children DO NOT use the School's Parking Lot for Student Pickups and Dropoffs.

 

 

SCHOOL CLOSING UPDATES! CONNECT ED. WILL GIVE YOU UP TO DATE INFORMATION!

           

        SCHOOL CLOSINGS!!

 

 

 CHECK FOR SCHOOL CLOSINGS

OR DELAYED OPENING WHEN INCLEMENT

WEATHER IS APPROACHING!

This information was last updated on 11/27/2011
 

Dear Parents,

I would like to remind each of you of emergency closing procedures due to inclement weather.

For delayed opening, Connect-ed calls will be made as early as possible.  Classes will begin at 10:20 AM.
Bus students will report to their assigned stop 90 minutes later than usual.

If the schools are closed, you will receive a call from your Connect-ed service asap.
Announcements of the closing or delayed opening will also be made over stations
WOR-AM (710), WINS-AM (1010), WABC -TV (Channel 7), Channel 34 WNBC - TV (Channel 4) Good Day NY - Fox (Channel 5), NEWS 12 NEW JERSEY, and the main page of our .

Please notify the office or nurse if there are any changes to telephone numbers, cell numbers, work numbers and emergency contact information.

For early closing due to inclement weather we will notify you between the hours of 10:45 AM and 12:00 PM.  It is very important that we have accurate phone numbers for this purpose.

Please prepare your child for any of these emergency situations and please do not call the school with last minute instructions.  With our large enrollment, we will be extremely busy making calls and cannot guarantee your message will reach your child.

 

Please do not call the Local Police

With your cooperation, our emergency procedures will work smoothly, ensuring the safety of your children.

Sincerely,

Mr.Cocucci - Principal

 

CLARENDON SCHOOL HOURS

School hours - 8:15 A.M. - 3:00 P.M..

 

One - Session Day Schedule

8:20 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.

.

Delayed Opening

9:45 A.M.

STUDENTS SHOULD NOT BE LEFT UNATTENDED DURING THE

MORNING HOURS - SCHOOL BEGINS AT 8:20 A.M. DO NOT DROP OFF YOUR CHILD BEFORE 8 A.M. WE ARE CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR CHILD'S SAFETY AND WELL BEING AND WOULD ASK THAT YOU ADHERE TO THIS TIME FRAME! STUDENTS

SHOULD NOT ARRIVE AT SCHOOL MORE THAT TEN

MINUTES BEFORE THE START OF SCHOOL.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT STUDENTS ARRIVE ON TIME

TO SCHOOL EACH DAY AS INSTRUCTIONAL TIME IS VERY

IMPORTANT.  A NOTE OF EXPLANATION, SIGNED BY A PARENT/GUARDIAN, IS REQUIRED WHEN A CHILD IS LATE

FOR ANY SCHOOL SESSION.  LATE STUDENTS MUST SIGN

IN AT THE MAIN OFFICE BEFORE REPORTING TO THEIR

CLASSROOMS.

HOMEWORK IS A TEAM EFFORT!

Why Do Teachers Assign Homework?

Teachers assign homework for many reasons. Homework can help children

  • review and practice what they've learned;
  • get ready for the next day's class;
  • learn to use resources, such as libraries, reference materials, and encyclopedias; and
  • explore subjects more fully than time permits in the classroom.

Homework can also help children develop good habits and attitudes.

It can teach children to work independently; encourage self-discipline and responsibility (assignments provide some youngsters with their first chance to manage time and meet deadlines); and encourage a love of learning.

Homework can also bring parents and educators closer together. Parents who supervise homework and work with their children on assignments learn about their children's education and about the school.

Homework is meant to be a positive experience and to encourage children to learn. Assignments should not be used as punishment.

 

Does Homework Help Children Learn?

Homework helps your child do better in school when assignments are meaningful, are completed successfully, and are returned with constructive comments from the teacher. An assignment should have a specific purpose, come with clear instructions, be fairly well matched to a student's abilities, and designed to help develop a student's knowledge and skills.

In the early elementary grades, homework can help children develop the habits and attitudes described earlier. From fourth through sixth grades, small amounts of homework, gradually increased each year, may support improved academic achievement. In seventh grade and beyond, students who complete more homework score better on standardized tests and earn better grades, on the average, than students who do less homework. The difference in test scores and grades between students who do more homework and those who do less increases as children move up through the grades.

 

How To Help: Show You Think Education and Homework Are Important

Children need to know that their parents and adults close to them think homework is important. If they know their parents care, children have a good reason to complete assignments and turn them in on time. There is a lot that you can do to show that you value education and homework.

Set a Regular Time.

Finding a regular time for homework helps children finish assignments. The best schedule is one that works for your child and your family. What works well in one household may not work in another. Of course, a good schedule depends in part on your child's age, as well as individual needs. For instance, one youngster may work best in the afternoon after an hour of play, and another may be more efficient after dinner (although late at night, when children are tired, is seldom a good time).

Outside activities, such as sports or music lessons, may mean that you need a flexible schedule. Your child may study after school on some days and in the evening on others. If there isn't enough time to finish homework, your child may need to drop some outside activity. Homework must be a high priority.

You'll need to work with your elementary school child to develop a schedule. An older student can probably make up a schedule independently, although you'll want to make sure it's a good one.

It may help to write out the schedule and put it in a place where you'll see it often, such as the refrigerator door.

Some families have a required amount of time that children must devote to homework or some other learning activity each school night (the length of time can vary depending upon the child's age). For instance, if your seventh-grader knows she's expected to spend an hour doing homework, reading, or visiting the library, she may be less likely to rush through assignments so that she can watch television. A required amount of time may also discourage her from "forgetting" to bring home assignments and help her adjust to a routine.

Pick a Place.

A study area should have lots of light, supplies close by, and be fairly quiet.

A study area doesn't have to be fancy. A desk in the bedroom is nice, but for many youngsters the kitchen table or a corner of the living room works just fine.

Your child may enjoy decorating a special study corner. A plant, a brightly colored container to hold pencils, and some favorite artwork taped to the walls can make study time more pleasant.

Remove Distractions.

Turn off the television and discourage social telephone calls during homework time. (A call to a classmate about an assignment may, however, be helpful.)

Some youngsters work well with quiet background music, but loud noise from the stereo or radio is not OK. One Virginia junior high school history teacher laments, "I've actually had a kid turn in an assignment that had written in the middle, `And George Washington said, "Ohhhhh, I love you."' The kid was so plugged into the music that he wasn't concentrating."

If you live in a small or noisy household, try having all family members take part in a quiet activity during homework time. You may need to take a noisy toddler outside or into another room to play. If distractions can't be avoided, your child may want to complete assignments in a nearby library.

Provide Supplies and Identify Resources.

For starters, collect pencils, pens, erasers, writing paper, an assignment book, and a dictionary. Other things that might be helpful include glue, a stapler, paper clips, maps, a calculator, a pencil sharpener, tape, scissors, a ruler, index cards, a thesaurus, and an almanac. Keep these items together in one place if possible. If you can't provide your child with needed supplies, check with the teacher, school guidance counselor, or principal about possible sources of assistance.

For books and other information resources, check with the school library or local public library. Some libraries have homework centers designed especially to assist children with school assignments (there may even be tutors and other kinds of individual assistance).

These days many schools have computers in classrooms, and many households have personal computers. However, you don't have to have a computer in your home in order for your child to complete homework assignments successfully.

You may want to ask the teacher to explain school policy about the use of computers--or typewriters or any special equipment--for homework. Certainly, computers can be a great learning tool and helpful for some assignments. They can be used for word processing and on-line reference resources, as well as educational programs and games to sharpen skills. Some schools may offer after-school programs where your child can use the school computers. And many public libraries make computers available to children.

Set a Good Example.

Children are more likely to study if they see you reading, writing, and doing things that require thought and effort on your part. Talk with your child about what you're reading and writing even if it's something as simple as making the grocery list. Tell them about what you do at work. Encourage activities that support learning--for example, educational games, library visits, walks in the neighborhood, trips to the zoo or museums, and chores that teach a sense of responsibility.

Show an Interest.

Make time to take your child to the library to check out materials needed for homework (and for fun too), and read with your child as often as you can. Talk about school and learning activities in family conversations. Ask your child what was discussed in class that day. If he doesn't have much to say, try another approach. For example, ask your child to read aloud a story he wrote or discuss the results of a science experiment.

Another good way to show your interest is to attend school activities, such as parent-teacher meetings, shows, and sports events. If you can, volunteer to help in the classroom or at special events. Getting to know some classmates and other parents not only shows you're interested but helps build a network of support for you and your child.

Instill a Love in Learning

Children who have a broad foundation of knowledge and background on a variety of subjects will find school and learning easier and more interesting than those who do not. Parents have the privilege and responsibility to share the world with their children.

Talking with your child about life's everyday experiences will help each of you understand the others' viewpoints, values, dreams, and interests. Parents need not only talk, but also listen to their children. Answering questions, or helping children find the answers, will help your child develop a sense of value and self-respect.

Many parents think activities such as going to the zoo, museums, or shows make up for lost time with their children. But, there can be just as much educational value in everyday activities, such as going to the bank, going grocery shopping, or doing a project at home. Parents just need to plan ahead a little to help their child discover the world.

Here are a few suggestions for activities to enjoy with your child:

  • Watch news and documentaries on TV.
  • Rent or buy educational videos.
  • Visit natural history museums, science museums, art museums, children's museums, zoos, botanical gardens, and historical sites.
  • Experience national or state parks and forests. Sign up for a tour.
  • Read articles in the newspaper, news, and magazines together.
  • Go to the public library.
  • Make vacations learning experiences.
  • Plan "theme" parties that involve some research. For example, an American Revolution costume party, a play, or a display of inventions of the time.

The important thing for parents to remember is that they are the most important teachers in their child's life. Children are born eager to learn, but parents need to help them channel that learning. Talking with children before, during, and after any activity helps them learn the steps involved in learning.

This conversation also will improve your communication and in turn, your relationship with your child. The more you talk with each other, the more rewarding your conversations will be, and the better you will get to know your child.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT THE WEBSITE LISTED BELOW.

http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/succeed/01-parental.html

ALL VOLUNTEERS AND VISITORS ARE REQUIRED TO WEAR THE IDENTIFICATION BADGE ISSUED IN THE SCHOOL OFFICE. PLEASE REPORT TO THE MAIN OFFICE TO SIGN IN.

 

JUST A REMINDER:  ITEMS NOT PERMITTED IN SCHOOL ARE...

1.  WALKMAN RADIOS, TAPE PLAYERS, CD PLAYERS AND IPODS.

2.  ELECTRONIC GAMES ETC.

3.  VIDEOS - LUNCHTIME VIDEOS WILL BE AVAILABLE IN THE SCHOOL LIBRARY.

4.  BASEBALLS, SOFTBALLS, AND SOCCER BALLS

Mr. Viggiani, PRINCIPAL